Improving Deaf people’s access to mental health services

As many as two in three Deaf people in the UK struggle with mental health problems, but most find it too difficult to access psychological therapy.

Guidance for commissioners of primary care mental health services for deaf people from the Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health (JCPMH) and Deaf health charity SignHealth, calls for improvement to deaf people’s access to mental health services.

Despite having poorer mental health than the rest of the population, the 60,000 people across the UK who use sign language as their main language often come up against barriers when seeking mental health services.

The guide’s recommendations for commissioners of primary mental health services could make a dramatic change to the mental health of many Deaf people.

Effective events for local quality improvement following national clinical audit

This guide aims to contain everything needed to plan, organise and deliver effective quality improvement workshops – and how to follow up and maintain momentum | HQIP

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Image source: HQIP

Event planning should be straight forward and rewarding, but at times can also be time consuming and complex. You’ll find helpful ideas, checklists, useful website links, templates and case studies.

This guide is produced by the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) National Clinical Audit (NCA) team and HQIP and based around learnings from a series of local events held by the IBD team to drive quality improvement following national audit.

Download the full guide here

IT intervention to support medicine optimisation in primary care

Jeffries, M. et al. (2017) Understanding the implementation and adoption of an information technology intervention to support medicine optimisation in primary care: qualitative study using strong structuration theory. BMJ Open. 7:e014810

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Objectives: Using strong structuration theory, we aimed to understand the adoption and implementation of an electronic clinical audit and feedback tool to support medicine optimisation for patients in primary care.

Conclusions: Successful implementation of information technology interventions for medicine optimisation will depend on a combination of the infrastructure within primary care, social structures embedded in the technology and the conventions, norms and dispositions of those utilising it. Future interventions, using electronic audit and feedback tools to improve medication safety, should consider the complexity of the social and organisational contexts and how internal and external structures can affect the use of the technology in order to support effective implementation.

Read the full article here

Telehealthcare for patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Lilholt, P.H. et al. (2017) BMJ Open. 7:e014587.

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Image source: Neil Webb – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Objective: To assess the effect of telehealthcare compared with usual practice in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Conclusions: The overall sample and all subgroups demonstrated no statistically significant differences in HRQoL between telehealthcare and usual practice.

Read the full article here

Transforming healthcare through collaboration

This report explores the ways that companies, governments and researchers around the world are collaborating to improve the innovation process in health, from the way that problems are identified to how new products and services are created and then adopted by providers of healthcare.

The guide is the result of a collaboration with the State of São Paulo and the UK government and involved testing open innovation methods in Brazil through two pilot projects. It identifies open innovation approaches across the innovation cycle.

The report lists the following success factors and challenges for open innovation initiatives:

  1. Respond to gaps in the innovation system.
  2. Start small and simple.
  3. Gain support from health leadership.
  4. Provide opportunities for interdisciplinary working.
  5. Focus on innovators as well as innovation.

Download the full document: Open innovation in health: A guide to transforming healthcare through collaboration 

Leading Across The Health And Care System: Lessons From Experience

This paper offers those who are leading new systems of care some guidance on how to address the challenges they face| The King’s Fund

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Image source: The King’s Fund

As the NHS seeks to move away from competition towards integration and to develop new models of care, individuals and organisations across the health and care system need to learn to work together to make the best use of collective skills and knowledge.

Part of our Leadership in action series, this paper offers those who are leading new systems of care some guidance on how to address the challenges they face. It draws on the Fund’s work on the development of new care models, sustainability and transformation plans, and accountable care organisations. It is also informed by the experience of people who have occupied system leadership roles and draws on case studies from our research and organisational development work.

Read the full report here

Telephone calls for post-discharge surveillance of surgical site infection

Nguhuni, B. et al. Antimicrobial Resistance & Infection Control | Published online: 8 May 2017

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Background: Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common post-operative complication causing significant morbidity and mortality. Many SSI occur after discharge from hospital. Post-discharge SSI surveillance in low and middle income countries needs to be improved.

Conclusion: The use of telephone interview as a diagnostic tool for post-discharge surveillance of SSI had moderate sensitivity and high specificity in Tanzania. Telephone-based detection may be a useful method for SSI surveillance in low-income settings with high penetration of mobile telephones.

Read the full article here