A Multifaceted Intervention to Improve Outcomes in Intensive Care

This study examines the effectiveness of a patient-centered care and engagement program in the medical ICU | Critical Care Medicine

Interventions: Structured patient-centered care and engagement training program and web-based technology including ICU safety checklist, tools to develop shared care plan, and messaging platform. Patient and care partner access to online portal to view health information, participate in the care plan, and communicate with providers.

Measurements and Main Results: Primary outcome was aggregate adverse event rate. Secondary outcomes included patient and care partner satisfaction, care plan concordance, and resource utilization. We included 2,105 patient admissions, (1,030 baseline and 1,075 during intervention periods). The aggregate rate of adverse events fell 29%, from 59.0 per 1,000 patient days (95% CI, 51.8-67.2) to 41.9 per 1,000 patient days (95% CI, 36.3-48.3; p < 0.001), during the intervention period. Satisfaction improved markedly from an overall hospital rating of 71.8 (95% CI, 61.1-82.6) to 93.3 (95% CI, 88.2-98.4; p < 0.001) for patients and from 84.3 (95% CI, 81.3-87.3) to 90.0 (95% CI, 88.1-91.9; p < 0.001) for care partners. No change in care plan concordance or resource utilization.

Conclusions: Implementation of a structured team communication and patient engagement program in the ICU was associated with a reduction in adverse events and improved patient and care partner satisfaction.

Full reference: Dykes, P. et al. (2017) Prospective Evaluation of a Multifaceted Intervention to Improve Outcomes in Intensive Care: The Promoting Respect and Ongoing Safety Through Patient Engagement Communication and Technology Study. Critical Care Medicine. Published online: 3rd May 2017

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Improving quality and safety in healthcare: learning from incidents

NHS Improvement

This resource outlines case studies on improving incident reporting culture, providing feedback to staff involved in incidents, sharing learning across the organisation and changing practice to prevent recurrence.

Investigation into NHS continuing healthcare funding

National Audit Office

National Audit Office has published findings of investigation into NHS continuing healthcare.

NHS continuing healthcare (CHC) is a package of care provided outside of hospital that is arranged and funded solely by the NHS for individuals who have significant ongoing health care needs.  Funding for ongoing health care is a complex and highly sensitive area, which can affect some of the most vulnerable people in society and those that care for them. The number of people assessed as eligible for CHC funding has been growing by an average of 6.4% a year over the last four years.  In 2015-16, almost 160,000 people received, or were assessed as eligible for, CHC funding in the year, at a cost of £3.1 billion.

NHS financial temperature check: finance directors’ views on financial challenges facing the NHS in England

Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA)

HMF
This is the seventh in the HFMA’s series of briefings setting out finance directors’ views on the financial issues facing the NHS in England. The briefing draws on the responses of 73 finance directors of trusts and foundation trusts and chief finance officers of 100 CCGs. The NHS financial temperature check provides a national picture of finance directors’ views of the financial outlook and the challenges NHS finance staff are facing.

Learning from Scotland’s NHS

The Nuffield Trust has published Learning from Scotland’s NHS.

This report aims to identify how health care in Scotland is different, where its approach seems to solve problems being faced elsewhere in the UK, and whether that approach could be transplanted to England, Wales and Northern Ireland.  It also assesses whether there are areas where Scotland could learn from its peers.

The full report can be downloaded here

GPs to refer patients to libraries o promote access to reliable health information

GPs will be able to refer patients with long-term conditions to public libraries from this month under a charity-led scheme to promote access to reliable health information | GP Online

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A reading list of 28 trusted books for patients with long-term conditions, stocked by all public libraries in England from this month, has been drawn up under the scheme, backed by the RCGP and organisations including Public Health England.

The books on prescription scheme for patients with long-term conditions is an extension of the existing Reading Well programme, launched by charity the Reading Agency and the Society of Chief Librarians.

Thousands of GPs already refer patients to libraries under the existing scheme, which has focused on areas including mental health and support for patients with dementia and their carers.