NHS pressures – future trends

British Medical Association

BMA warns that unless urgent action is taken, millions more patients will be waiting for longer than 4-hours for treatment in A&E, and there will be dramatic rises in number of people waiting on trolleys for treatment, or at home for non-emergency elective procedures.

NIHR Signal Multiple illnesses and end-of-life care drive high healthcare costs in old age

Hazra N C, Rudisill C, Gulliford M C. Determinants of health care costs in the senior elderly: age, comorbidity, impairment, or proximity to death? Eur J Health Econ. 2017. [Epub ahead of print].

Ageing on its own does not drive healthcare costs. Instead, this research found that the increasing number of health conditions and age-related impairments along with the proximity to death are more strongly linked to healthcare costs than age alone.

This UK study investigated healthcare costs in people over 80 years old. Costs increased to the mid-90s before declining again. Proximity to death was the strongest predictor of cost, which was higher for people aged 80-84: £10,027 per year versus £7,021 per year for those over 100. Multiple illnesses also had a strong influence, with each additional health complaint progressively increasing costs.

This suggests that to provide person-centred and efficient healthcare services for all, planning should take account of the number and types of conditions rather than age alone.

Reducing delayed transfers of care over winter

NHS Improvement has written to the chief executives of all trusts providing community services setting out actions they must implement to reduce delayed transfers of care over winter. | NHS Improvement | HSJ

snow-2616580_1920.jpg

NHS Improvement  chief executive Jim Mackey has said trusts must help improve delayed discharges over winter and listed six actions they need to carry out in the next six months:

  1. Facilitate the sharing of patient data with acute and social care partners and from 7 November ensure daily situation reports are completed “to enable better understanding of community services at a national level”.
  2. Jointly assess discharge pathways with local partners including “being an active participant in the local acute provider’s discharge and hosting operational discussions daily where necessary to discharge patients in community settings”.
  3. Develop “discharges hubs” over the next six months and beyond, designed to be a single point of access for patients moving between acute and community services.
  4. Ensure a “robust patient choice policy” is implemented.
  5. Clarify to partner organisations what services the trust offers to patients.
  6. Ensure collection of patient flow data and data on plans to improve patient flow.

Full detail is given by NHS Improvement who have produced the following  report to help improve flow into and out of community health services:

Flow in providers of community health services: good practice guidance

Related HSJ article: Trust chiefs given new instructions to tackle winter DTOCs