New drive to improve care and save lives

Professor Sir Mike Richards has launched a major overhaul of cancer screening as part the NHS Long Term Plan’s renewed drive to improve care and save lives | via NHS England

Early detection of cancer, while the condition is easier to treat, is central to the plan which aims to prevent tens of thousands more deaths each year. Sir Mike Richards, who was the NHS’ first cancer director and is the former CQC chief inspector of hospitals, is leading an independent review of national screening programmes.

He will recommend how they should be upgraded to ensure they remain world leading and that patients benefit from new technologies and treatments.

As part of his work, Sir Mike wants to hear views and ideas from staff, patients and other groups to inform recommendations for the future of cancer screening.

Sir Mike is seeking feedback on a number of areas including:

  • Future management, delivery and oversight of screening programmes
  • How to ensure maximum screening uptake across the country and particularly in vulnerable and minority groups
  • Opportunities for the use of AI and other technology to help with cancer screening
  • Feedback on current and future IT and equipment
  • Having the right number of staff with the right training to deliver the programmes
  • Views on what screening should look like in ten years’ time

Full story at NHS England

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Empowering staff to make informed wellbeing choices

Public Health England | January 2019 | Empowering staff to make informed wellbeing choices

A new case study from Public Health England (PHE) demonstrates how Barking, Havering and Rebridge Hospitals Trust have established a health and wellbeing team to provide a wide variety of programmes to help employees lead a healthier lifestyle.

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Some of the actions taken by the Trust include:

  • establishing of a fruit and vegetable stall in the hospital entrance
  • a weekly timetable of various health initiatives for staff to participate in; in addition to a ‘green gym’ and an on-site tennis table
  • Health and wellbeing MOTs available to staff
  • Introduction of ‘Go by Bike’ staff pool bike scheme for commuting and cycling for  work purposes
  • the Trust becoming smoke-free

The case study also includes challenges, key successes and next steps

Empowering staff to make informed wellbeing choices

University of Sheffield supports only second scanner of its kind in the UK for Sheffield Children’s Hospital

University of Sheffield | January 2019 | University of Sheffield supports only second scanner of its kind in the UK for Sheffield Children’s Hospital

The University of Sheffield has helped fund a life-changing EOS scanner to help young patients at Sheffield Children’s Hospital, only the second of its kind for children in the UK. 

Based on a Nobel prize-winning invention, EOS provides an ultra-low dose 2D and 3D digital X-ray system and will hugely improve the diagnosis and treatment of orthopaedic patients. Patients can sit or stand, with a complete head-to-toe image provided in 15 seconds or less.

The machine also ensures an 80% reduction in X-ray exposure, reduced waiting times and improved image quality enabling more accurate assessments and surgical planning. It will enhance the already world-leading spinal service at Sheffield Children’s Hospital, which became the first hospital in Europe last year to perform ground-breaking ‘trolley’ surgery to correct a spine curvature.

The machine was made possible thanks to a donation from the Morrisons Foundation, a charity set up by the supermarket, and large donations from The University of Sheffield and David and Jean Fyfe’s 2018 Daffodil Ball in aid of The Children’s Hospital Charity.

The new equipment will particularly aid those patients requiring limb and spine curvature examinations, who will now be able to get a much clearer X-ray. The reduction in radiation exposure will also help those requiring regular scans, such as scoliosis spine patients.

John Somers, Chief Executive of Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, said “We are incredibly grateful to the people who support our work here at Sheffield Children’s. Our staff are amazing, providing specialist care with compassion every day. But with the latest equipment and donor-funded facilities, we can go even further to help children both locally and nationally.” (Source: University of Sheffield)

Read the full press release  University of Sheffield supports only second scanner of its kind in the UK for Sheffield Children’s Hospital