Encouraging speaking up through trust wide engagement

NHS Employers

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Source: NHS Employers

This shared learning example describes how Lisa Smith, Freedom to Speak Up guardian in York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust has engaged with multiple sites to help foster a positive, safe culture of speaking up.

With one of the largest NHS geographies in the UK, find out more about the methods being used by Lisa at York to promote awareness of raising concerns, including attending flu clinics to reach out to as many staff as possible.

Improving the working environment for safe surgical care

Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (RCSEd), 2017

 

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Source: Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh

The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (RCSEd) has published a number of critical recommendations to government to greatly improve safety in the delivery of surgical treatment and patient care, with seven recommendations for best practice.

The RCSEd surveyed opinions from a cross-section of the UK surgical workforce – from trainees to consultants – which highlighted broad inefficiencies on the frontline which impact the working environment and the delivery of a safe service.

The report notes factors adversely affecting morale, including a lack of team structure, poor communication, high stress levels, and limited training opportunities. The report also records how staff, at times, feel diverted away from the patient-centred care they strive to deliver because of administrative and IT issues, and believe that being more innovative and efficient with existing resources could make a positive difference.

And while there is no doubt the NHS needs more funding, the report indicates improvements can be made by changing how funding is allocated.

An Innovative Approach to Managing Behavioral and Psychological Dementia

The older adult population in long-term care is experiencing significant growth, which includes an increased number of minority admissions. An estimated 48% of long-term care patients are admitted with a diagnosis of dementia | The Journal for Nurse Practitioners

Highlights: 

  • Nurse practitioners are in a key position to provide culturally appropriate care in older adults with BPSD
  • Personalized music is an evidence-based, patient centered intervention to reduce BPSD
  • Regulatory agencies are closely monitoring the management of BPSD in long-term care facilities.
  • Personalized music can be an interdisciplinary approach in the management of BPSD

Patient-centered, culturally appropriate care is critical in the management of dementia and treatment of associated behavior and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). The use of personalized music playlists has shown promise in the interdisciplinary treatment of BPSD. Regulatory agencies are closely monitoring the management of BPSD. Accurate diagnosis and treatment of BPSD is an increasingly important skill for the provider.

Full reference: Long, E.M. (2017) An Innovative Approach to Managing Behavioral and Psychological Dementia. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners. Vol. 13 (Issue 7) pp. 475-481

Enhancing Patient Safety Through Physician Health and Well-being Research.

Keeping medical practitioners healthy is an important consideration for workforce satisfaction and retention, as well as public safety | Journal of Patient Safety

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However, there is limited evidence demonstrating how to best care for this group. The absence of data is related to the lack of available funding in this area of research. Supporting investigations that examine physician health often “fall through the cracks” of traditional funding opportunities, landing somewhere between patient safety and workforce development priorities. To address this, funders must extend the scope of current grant opportunities by broadening the scope of patient safety and its relationship to physician health. Other considerations are allocating a portion of doctors’ licensing fees to support physician health research and encourage researchers to collaborate with interested stakeholders who can underwrite the costs of studies. Ultimately, funding studies of physician health benefits not only the community of doctors but also the millions of patients receiving care each year.

Full reference: Brooks, E. et al. (2017) Investing in Physicians Is Investing in Patients: Enhancing Patient Safety Through Physician Health and Well-being Research. Journal of Patient Safety: Published online: July 20, 20.7

New framework to promote person-centred approaches in healthcare

Skills for Health, Health Education England and Skills for Care have announced a new Framework to support person-centred approaches for the health and social care workforce | Skills for Health

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Image source: Skills for Health

This approach, outlined in the Five Year Forward View, puts people, families and communities at the heart of health, care and wellbeing. It encourages people to speak with staff about what is important to them, helping to develop a shared understanding of what matters to them.

The new framework, commissioned by Health Education England, helps workers communicate meaningfully both verbally and non-verbally, tailoring the care and advice they give to suit peoples’ needs. It supports individuals to better manage their own health and wellbeing through bespoke care, planning and support. Where appropriate, the framework encourages shared decision making, outlining all reasonable options and ensuring that all information is personalised, accessible and useful.

Practical value in the NHS

The King’s Fund has previously highlighted the fact that addressing waste and variability in clinical work can create better value in the NHS. But what does value mean to people working in the NHS – and how it is being applied in practice? | The King’s Fund Blog

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‘Value’ sounds like a familiar concept but it can mean different things to different people. One definition of value in the health and care sector is ‘health outcomes per dollar spent’, so attempts to increase value can look at either improving quality or reducing cost.

In early July we held a roundtable discussion with health service providers to better understand their approach to value improvement – initial research for a new project intended to understand the practical barriers and challenges that frontline clinical, operational and managerial leaders have encountered in pursuing better value health care. Experts who attended – including a chairman, chief executive, chief nurse, deputy chief operating officer, change leader, and representatives of national bodies – agreed that the emphasis should be on patient care. Clinicians are more likely to engage in a programme that revolves around the quality of services, and better care is typically less wasteful, so as one participant put it, ‘if you focus on quality, money will fall out’ [spending will reduce]. Consultants will often drive through successful programmes with change management teams, but we also discussed the role of junior doctors, nurses and therapists, who frequently witness low-value care and understand how to fix it. We know that substantial changes in practice can be delivered as we have seen, for example, in generic prescribing, reduced length of stay and the move towards day case surgery.

Read the full blog post here

Investment in NHS transformation projects

Secretary of State for Health and NHS England have announced £325m of capital investment for local projects that will help the NHS to modernise and transform care for patients.

Patients will see this investment deliver faster diagnosis for conditions like cancer, easier access to mental health care, expansion of A&Es, shorter waits for operations, and more services in GPs surgeries. This initial tranche of funding has been targeted at the strongest and most advanced schemes in STPs.

Read more via NHS England

Additional link: RCGP press release