IT intervention to support medicine optimisation in primary care

Jeffries, M. et al. (2017) Understanding the implementation and adoption of an information technology intervention to support medicine optimisation in primary care: qualitative study using strong structuration theory. BMJ Open. 7:e014810

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Objectives: Using strong structuration theory, we aimed to understand the adoption and implementation of an electronic clinical audit and feedback tool to support medicine optimisation for patients in primary care.

Conclusions: Successful implementation of information technology interventions for medicine optimisation will depend on a combination of the infrastructure within primary care, social structures embedded in the technology and the conventions, norms and dispositions of those utilising it. Future interventions, using electronic audit and feedback tools to improve medication safety, should consider the complexity of the social and organisational contexts and how internal and external structures can affect the use of the technology in order to support effective implementation.

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Early benefits of delegated commissioning

NHS England have produced a series of Delegated commissioning case studies to show how CCGs are using delegated commissioning to improve care for local people. 

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CCGs have reported that delegated commissioning is leading to:

  • The development of clearer, more joined up visions for primary care, aligned to wider CCG and STP plans for improving health services;
  • Improved access to primary care;
  • Improved quality of care being delivered to patients;
  • Improved CCG relationships with member practices, including greater local ownership of the development of primary care services;
  • Increased clinical leadership in primary care commissioning, enabling more local decision making;
  • Greater involvement of patients in shaping services;
  • A more sustainable primary care system for the future.

NHS England have produced a series of case studies to show how CCGs are using delegated commissioning to improve care for local people:

Shaping healthy cities and economies: the role of clinical commissioning

NHS Clinical Commissioners, December 2016

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NHS Clinical Commissioners

This report showcases how clinical leaders in England’s core cities – the eight largest cities outside of London – are looking at how the services they commission can improve not only the health but social and economic wellbeing of their populations. The report finds that in these areas, clinical commissioners are working with a wide range of partners to go beyond traditional boundaries to combat health inequalities and social exclusion, increase skills and employment and to attract inward investment to help realise the potential of their local economies.

 

Technology enabled care services

TSA, the industry body for technology enabled care, has published Putting people first: commissioning for connected care, homes and communities.

 

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This report looks at how the care technology sector supports health and social care commissioners to commission technology enabled care services that meet the growing and changing needs of the entire system.  One of the themes included in the report is that commissioners need to ensure the commissioning approach focuses on outcomes and not inputs.

 

Changing risk behaviours and promoting cognitive health in older adults

A summary of reviews supporting the commissioning of interventions across a range of health behaviours for older adults. | Public Health England

This resource is intended for local authority and clinical commissioning groups to identify what types of interventions they should focus on to help the uptake and maintenance of healthy behaviours and promote cognitive health among older adults living in the community.

It is also intended for providers of lifestyle behaviour change programmes to support the development of evidence-informed prevention packages for older adults.

It is produced in a way that makes it accessible to public health managers and practitioners working in the public, private and third sector.

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Image source: http://www.gov.uk

Community based end of life care commissioning

Public Health England has published Public perceptions and experiences of community-based end of life care initiatives: a qualitative research report.

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This report is aimed at commissioners of end of life care services to support new ways of commissioning through using public health approaches to build compassionate communities. The key objectives of the research were to understand the awareness and knowledge of community end of life care across a number of key audiences; their perceptions of community end of life care; their experiences of end of life care and any community initiatives; and any improvements that could be made to community end of life care.

New resources to help commissioners embed social value

A new set of resources to help commissioners embed an outcomes based approach to their procurement of public services has been launched.

Following The Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012, commissioners are increasingly looking for positive social outcomes, which have a lasting impact and can be clearly demonstrated to stakeholders. At a time when budgets are tighter than they have ever been, maintaining public confidence and positive perceptions is a constant challenge for commissioners, which needs to be carefully managed if initiatives are to be delivered successfully and on time.

The resources from Social Enterprise Mark focus on an outcomes based approach to commissioning, and explain how asking for the Social Enterprise Mark/Gold Mark in commissioning criteria is an easy way of embedding social value within contract specifications and demonstrating consideration of the Social Value Act.

Further information: