Transforming children and young people’s mental health

Ways for schools and colleges to support pupils’ mental health are set out in a green paper, as well as plans for new mental health support teams.

The government has published proposals to improve mental health support for children and young people in England. Over £300 million has been made available to fund them.

The government is asking people for their views on the planned measures, which are set out in a green paper. The measures include:

  • encouraging every school and college to have a ‘designated senior mental health lead’
  • setting up mental health support teams working with schools, to give children and young people earlier access to services
  • piloting a 4-week waiting time for NHS children and young people’s mental health services

Other proposals in the green paper include:

  • a new working group to look at mental health support for 16 to 25-year-olds
  • a report by the Chief Medical Officer on the impact that technology has on children and young people’s mental health, to be produced in 2018

The consultation on the green paper will run for 13 weeks until 2 March 2018.

Full document: Transforming children and young people’s mental health provision: a green paper

This short video describes the main proposals in the green paper.

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New collaborative to support the physical health of people with a mental illness

Equally Well: A new collaborative to support the physical health of people with a mental illness | via Centre for Mental Health

In October 2016, the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges published the report ‘Improving the physical health of adults with severe mental illness: essential actions’  The report outlined the changes that were needed to make a sustained impact on the physical health of people living with a mental illness. It highlighted that coordinated national effort would be needed to bring good practice to scale and support further innovation and improvement across the country.

Equally Well  is an initiative from New Zealand which seeks to promote and support such collaborative action to improve physical health among people with a mental illness.

Now in the UK, the Centre for Mental Health, Kaleidoscope and Rethink Mental Illness are working together with support from the Royal College of GPs and the Royal College of Psychiatrists to create an Equally Well collaborative in this country.

New £15 million grant scheme to improve mental healthcare

The Beyond Places of Safety fund will focus on improving urgent mental healthcare in local areas | Department of Health 

The Department of Health has launched a £15 million fund to better support people at risk of experiencing a mental health crisis.

The Beyond Places of Safety scheme aims to improve support services for those needing urgent and emergency mental healthcare. This includes conditions such as psychosis, bipolar disorder, and personality disorders that could cause people to be a risk to themselves or others.

The Beyond Places of Safety scheme will focus on:

  • preventing people from reaching crisis point in the first place
  • helping to develop new approaches to support people who experience a mental health crisis

Full story at Department of Health

Mental Health Service Models for Young People

In 2015, the government committed five years of extra funding for children and young people’s mental health services (CYPMHS). All areas of England were required to submit plans outlining how they will improve their services by 2020.

This POSTnote describes some of the new models of CYPMHS and examines the challenges to their effective implementation.

Overview

  • The Office for National Statistics estimates that nearly one in four Children and Young People (CYP) show some evidence of mental ill health.
  • It is estimated that between £70-100 billion is lost each year in the UK due to poor
    mental health.
  • New models of CYP mental health services are currently being developed across the
    country to suit the unique needs of local areas. They include whole-system, schoolsbased, community-based and other models, and involve integrating services from across the statutory and voluntary sectors.
  • Issues with implementing new service models include data monitoring, recruiting
    and retaining staff and funding.

Full document available here

Supporting people with severe mental health problems into work

Making Individual Placement and Support work: an evaluation of implementation and sustainability | The Centre for Mental Health.

This report is an independent evaluation of the Making Individual Placement and Support (IPS) Work programme. Across six sites where IPS was being expanded, InHealth Associates interviewed stakeholders to explore the critical success factors for implementing and sustaining IPS services. The evaluation, found that these IPS services had many benefits, not only in helping people to get jobs but also in building clients’ confidence and, as a result, improving staff morale.

Full report available here

The future of the mental health workforce

 The future of the mental health workforce | Centre for Mental Health

This report is based on insights from service users, carers and professionals and outlines a list of recommendations for a sustainable mental health workforce.

It emphasises the importance of prevention, including the role of GPs in supporting people before they reach crisis point. It describes commissioning of mental health services as in “crisis” with a “shrinking workforce, growing expectations and exhausting demands” putting pressure on staff across the country.

The report makes 22 recommendations for policy, practice, education and training, highlighting 4 key calls to action:

  1. For mental health careers to be promoted in schools and colleges: to build on growing awareness and understanding about mental health to encourage young people to aspire to work in the sector when they’re considering their career choices
  2. For all mental health service providers to support the mental health and wellbeing of their staff: to become ‘compassionate organisations’ that care for the people who work in them
  3. For mental health workers to get training in the skills they will need in the future, including in coproduction, community engagement and psychological interventions
  4. For people to be able to build their careers more flexibly, working in a range of different settings and sectors, and taking on new roles as they get older

Download the full report: The future of the mental health workforce

Better mental health: JSNA toolkit

This toolkit links mental health data, policy and knowledge to help planners understand needs within the local population and assess local services.

The guide accompanies the Mental Health and Wellbeing JSNA fingertips profile.

It includes short, bite-sized sections which help people to develop a picture of mental health needs in a local area. The guide begins with sections on understanding place and understanding people. These focus on understanding risk, wellbeing, prevention and community resilience in the local population.

Later sections cover the mental health care pathway, following a life course approach. These include the perinatal period, children and young people, working age adults and older people.

Each section follows a similar structure:

  • introduction to the topic
  • list of potential questions a JSNA may attempt to answer
  • overview of some relevant policy and guidance
  • list of available national data sources
  • ideas for sources of local data
  • links to relevant evidence and further information

Documents can be accessed via Public Health England