Help at Home – Use of assistive technology for older people

This review presents a selection of recent research on assistive technology for older people funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and other government funders. The review focusses on research around the use of technology in the home, remote monitoring systems and designing better environments for older people | NIHR

More people are living longer with complex conditions and needs. Technology can help people to stay living well and safely at home as they get older. But technology is changing rapidly and it can be challenging to get the right technology for the right person with the right support. There has been considerable investment recently in developing and evaluating assistive technologies for older people. But this is a relatively new field and there are important gaps in what we know.

Full report: Help at Home – Use of assistive technology for older people

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Image source: http://www.dc.nihr.ac.uk

 

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Falls specialist response vehicle

NHS Improvement | October 2018 | Falls specialist response vehicle

An innovative approach to the winter pressures faced by ambulance crews  involved establishing a specialist vehicle service responding to callouts for falls at home.

The service was  trialled in the London Ambulance Service (LAS)  and North East London NHS Foundation  Trust in 2017/18 to set up a specialist vehicle service responding to callouts for falls at home. The he case study outlines the steps taken in response to frail older people making calls to 999, which meant ambulances were unable to attend the highest acuity calls, patient flow through ED was reduced and hospital beds were occupied unnecessarily.

 

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Key outcomes from the specialist vehicle service

  • 1,376 patients were attended
  • 960 were safely kept at home
  • 768 bed days were released (based on 80% of patients staying one night)
  • £173,760 was saved (based on £181 per person cost of A&E attendance)

Read the full details of the case study at NHS Improvement 

 

Improving Care for Older People

Improving care for older people | NHS England

Advances in health care have helped people in England to live longer than ever before. As a result, the number of older people in England is growing significantly and this rate of growth is projected to speed up over the next 20 years. This is good news for all of us but it creates a challenge for the NHS – as we get older we tend to get long term conditions and need more health and social care. nurse-2683782_1920.png

This guide to Improving Care for Older People, developed by NHS England in partnership with Age UK, Public Health England, and the Chief Fire Officer’s Association, is a collection of resources which aims to help people stay well, and continue living independently, for as long as possible.

Full detail at NHS England

The challenge of ageing populations and patient frailty: can primary care adapt?

Reeves, David et al. The challenge of ageing populations and patient frailty: can primary care adapt? BMJ 2018;362:k3349

BMJ analysis notes in overstretched UK primary care system, acid test is likely to be whether GPs find that a focus on frailty helps to reduce, rather than increase, professional burden in dealing with their most complex patients, while also benefiting their older frail patients.

 

Improving the experience of care and support for people using adult social care services

This guideline covers the care and support of adults receiving social care in their own homes, residential care and community settings | National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)

This NICE guideline aims to help people understand what care they can expect in residential and community settings, and to improve their experience by supporting them to make decisions about their care.

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The guideline has been developed by a committee of people who use services, and carers and professionals. It has used information from a review of research evidence about people’s experiences of care and support, and from expert witnesses. The committee also gave consideration to the potential resource impact of the recommendations. The recommendations are considered to be aspirational but achievable.

It includes recommendations on:

It is for:

  • Practitioners working in adult social care services in all settings.
  • Service managers and providers of adult social care services.
  • Commissioners of adult social care services.
  • People using services (including those who fund their own care) and their families, carers and advocates.

Full reference: People’s experience in adult social care services: improving the experience of care and support for people using adult social care services | NICE guideline [NG86]

See also:  NICE interactive flowchart – People’s experience in adult social care services

 

Falls prevention: cost-effective commissioning

Public Health England, 15 February 2018

The return on investment tool pulls together evidence on the effectiveness and associated costs for interventions aimed at preventing falls in older people living in the community. The flexible Excel sheet allows for results to be tailored to the local situation based on the knowledge of the user. All interventions are aimed at those aged 65 and over.

The tool comes with an accompanying report, which details how the tool was constructed and presents the main results.

The second report summarises the findings from a literature review carried out to identify cost-effective interventions.

Local authorities and Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) can use results from the tool to protect and improve the health of their local populations when making commissioning decisions.

Enhanced health in care homes

Enhanced health in care homes: learning from experiences so far | The King’s Fund

This report draws on published literature about joining up and co-ordinating care homes and health services. It also draws on interviews with a range of providers, local authorities and CCGs. It aims to help care homes and NHS providers (including GPs), local authorities and CCGs who are thinking through how to join up and co-ordinate services locally and how to manage the complexities involved.

The report makes recommendations for extending enhanced health in care homes to all areas, supporting and developing leaders, and ensuring that people living in care homes can access high-quality health care.

Full report: Enhanced health in care homes: learning from experiences so far