Urgent and emergency care: best practice

This CQC report offers practical examples of how leading emergency departments are meeting the challenges of managing capacity and demand, and managing risks to patient safety .

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This report from the Care Quality Commission details the good practice identified following the Commission’s work with consultants, clinical leads, senior nursing staff and managers from leading emergency departments in 17 NHS acute trusts.

This resource identifies:

  • strategies staff use to meet the challenge of increased demand and manage risks to patient safety
  • positive actions to address potential safety risks and to manage increased demand better
  • how working with others can manage patient flow and ensure patients get the care they need
  • that rising demand pressures in emergency departments are an issue for the whole hospital and local health economy.

Full report: Sharing best practice from clinical leaders in emergency departments

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Reducing delayed transfers of care over winter

NHS Improvement has written to the chief executives of all trusts providing community services setting out actions they must implement to reduce delayed transfers of care over winter. | NHS Improvement | HSJ

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NHS Improvement  chief executive Jim Mackey has said trusts must help improve delayed discharges over winter and listed six actions they need to carry out in the next six months:

  1. Facilitate the sharing of patient data with acute and social care partners and from 7 November ensure daily situation reports are completed “to enable better understanding of community services at a national level”.
  2. Jointly assess discharge pathways with local partners including “being an active participant in the local acute provider’s discharge and hosting operational discussions daily where necessary to discharge patients in community settings”.
  3. Develop “discharges hubs” over the next six months and beyond, designed to be a single point of access for patients moving between acute and community services.
  4. Ensure a “robust patient choice policy” is implemented.
  5. Clarify to partner organisations what services the trust offers to patients.
  6. Ensure collection of patient flow data and data on plans to improve patient flow.

Full detail is given by NHS Improvement who have produced the following  report to help improve flow into and out of community health services:

Flow in providers of community health services: good practice guidance

Related HSJ article: Trust chiefs given new instructions to tackle winter DTOCs

Future of health and healthcare in England

RAND Europe | Future of Health: Findings from a survey of stakeholders on the future of health and healthcare in England

This report presents findings from a survey to gather and synthesise stakeholder views on the future of health and healthcare in England in 20 to 30 years’ time. The aim of the research was to generate an evidenced-based picture of the future health and healthcare needs in order to inform strategic discussions both about the future priorities of the National Institute for Health Research and the health and social care research communities more broadly.

Key trends and changes which emerged from the survey included: an ageing population that lives longer but not necessarily in better health; rising health inequalities; the increasing influence of unhealthy lifestyle choices; increases in the burden of mental health, especially for children and older people and; the future threat of changing patterns of infectious and respiratory disease, in part due to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and air pollution.

Full document can be downloaded here

Developing accountable care systems

Developing accountable care systems: lessons from Canterbury, New Zealand | The Kings Fund

This report examines how the Canterbury health system  in New Zealand has moderated demand for hospital care, particularly among older people, by investing in alternative models of provision and community-based services.  The transformation has taken more than a decade and required significant investment; this report considers the lessons that the NHS can learn.

New model of Primary Care provision

New report from the Nuffield Trust evaluates an initiative called the Primary Care Home (PCH) model developed by the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC).

The primary care home model was developed by the National Association of Primary Care as a response to workforce challenges, rising demand and opportunities to shape transformation in local health and care systems across England.

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Image source: nuffieldtrust.org.uk

This report from the Nufield Trust suggests that the new models of primary care provision are showing early signs of success but will need more resources and support for these models to work well on a permanent basis.

The evaluation found that participating in the primary care home programme had strengthened inter-professional working between GPs and other health professionals while also stimulating new services and ways of working, tailored to the needs of different patient groups.

It was judged to be too early in the scheme’s development for the Nuffield Trust to quantify impacts on patient outcomes, patient experience or use of wider health services.

Full report: Primary Care Home. Evaluating a new model of primary care.

Related: New primary care model needs resources, say experts | OnMedica

Improving care and support for children and young people with mental health problems

Three Royal Colleges have jointly agreed five shared principles designed to improve care and support for children and young people with mental health problems.

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The Royal College of General Practitioners, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and The Royal College of Psychiatrists have issued a position statement saying that as well as the commissioning of specialist treatment, an effective child and young people’s (CYP) mental health system required:

  • acknowledgment that CYP mental health is everybody’s business and should be supported by a shared vision for CYP mental health across all government departments
  • a preventative, multi-agency approach to mental health across all ages, incorporating attention to education for young people and families, social determinants, and health promotion
  • a system of national and local accountability for population-level CYP mental health and well-being, delivered via integrated local area systems
  • training and education for the whole children’s workforce in their role and responsibilities for CYP mental health
  • more support, both from specialist services and other sectors, for professionals dealing with CYP who do not meet referral threshold to CAMHS.

Full document: Position statement on children and young peoples’ mental health

A Multifaceted Intervention to Improve Outcomes in Intensive Care

This study examines the effectiveness of a patient-centered care and engagement program in the medical ICU | Critical Care Medicine

Interventions: Structured patient-centered care and engagement training program and web-based technology including ICU safety checklist, tools to develop shared care plan, and messaging platform. Patient and care partner access to online portal to view health information, participate in the care plan, and communicate with providers.

Measurements and Main Results: Primary outcome was aggregate adverse event rate. Secondary outcomes included patient and care partner satisfaction, care plan concordance, and resource utilization. We included 2,105 patient admissions, (1,030 baseline and 1,075 during intervention periods). The aggregate rate of adverse events fell 29%, from 59.0 per 1,000 patient days (95% CI, 51.8-67.2) to 41.9 per 1,000 patient days (95% CI, 36.3-48.3; p < 0.001), during the intervention period. Satisfaction improved markedly from an overall hospital rating of 71.8 (95% CI, 61.1-82.6) to 93.3 (95% CI, 88.2-98.4; p < 0.001) for patients and from 84.3 (95% CI, 81.3-87.3) to 90.0 (95% CI, 88.1-91.9; p < 0.001) for care partners. No change in care plan concordance or resource utilization.

Conclusions: Implementation of a structured team communication and patient engagement program in the ICU was associated with a reduction in adverse events and improved patient and care partner satisfaction.

Full reference: Dykes, P. et al. (2017) Prospective Evaluation of a Multifaceted Intervention to Improve Outcomes in Intensive Care: The Promoting Respect and Ongoing Safety Through Patient Engagement Communication and Technology Study. Critical Care Medicine. Published online: 3rd May 2017