Future of health and healthcare in England

RAND Europe | Future of Health: Findings from a survey of stakeholders on the future of health and healthcare in England

This report presents findings from a survey to gather and synthesise stakeholder views on the future of health and healthcare in England in 20 to 30 years’ time. The aim of the research was to generate an evidenced-based picture of the future health and healthcare needs in order to inform strategic discussions both about the future priorities of the National Institute for Health Research and the health and social care research communities more broadly.

Key trends and changes which emerged from the survey included: an ageing population that lives longer but not necessarily in better health; rising health inequalities; the increasing influence of unhealthy lifestyle choices; increases in the burden of mental health, especially for children and older people and; the future threat of changing patterns of infectious and respiratory disease, in part due to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and air pollution.

Full document can be downloaded here

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Developing accountable care systems

Developing accountable care systems: lessons from Canterbury, New Zealand | The Kings Fund

This report examines how the Canterbury health system  in New Zealand has moderated demand for hospital care, particularly among older people, by investing in alternative models of provision and community-based services.  The transformation has taken more than a decade and required significant investment; this report considers the lessons that the NHS can learn.

New model of Primary Care provision

New report from the Nuffield Trust evaluates an initiative called the Primary Care Home (PCH) model developed by the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC).

The primary care home model was developed by the National Association of Primary Care as a response to workforce challenges, rising demand and opportunities to shape transformation in local health and care systems across England.

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Image source: nuffieldtrust.org.uk

This report from the Nufield Trust suggests that the new models of primary care provision are showing early signs of success but will need more resources and support for these models to work well on a permanent basis.

The evaluation found that participating in the primary care home programme had strengthened inter-professional working between GPs and other health professionals while also stimulating new services and ways of working, tailored to the needs of different patient groups.

It was judged to be too early in the scheme’s development for the Nuffield Trust to quantify impacts on patient outcomes, patient experience or use of wider health services.

Full report: Primary Care Home. Evaluating a new model of primary care.

Related: New primary care model needs resources, say experts | OnMedica

Improving care and support for children and young people with mental health problems

Three Royal Colleges have jointly agreed five shared principles designed to improve care and support for children and young people with mental health problems.

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The Royal College of General Practitioners, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and The Royal College of Psychiatrists have issued a position statement saying that as well as the commissioning of specialist treatment, an effective child and young people’s (CYP) mental health system required:

  • acknowledgment that CYP mental health is everybody’s business and should be supported by a shared vision for CYP mental health across all government departments
  • a preventative, multi-agency approach to mental health across all ages, incorporating attention to education for young people and families, social determinants, and health promotion
  • a system of national and local accountability for population-level CYP mental health and well-being, delivered via integrated local area systems
  • training and education for the whole children’s workforce in their role and responsibilities for CYP mental health
  • more support, both from specialist services and other sectors, for professionals dealing with CYP who do not meet referral threshold to CAMHS.

Full document: Position statement on children and young peoples’ mental health

A Multifaceted Intervention to Improve Outcomes in Intensive Care

This study examines the effectiveness of a patient-centered care and engagement program in the medical ICU | Critical Care Medicine

Interventions: Structured patient-centered care and engagement training program and web-based technology including ICU safety checklist, tools to develop shared care plan, and messaging platform. Patient and care partner access to online portal to view health information, participate in the care plan, and communicate with providers.

Measurements and Main Results: Primary outcome was aggregate adverse event rate. Secondary outcomes included patient and care partner satisfaction, care plan concordance, and resource utilization. We included 2,105 patient admissions, (1,030 baseline and 1,075 during intervention periods). The aggregate rate of adverse events fell 29%, from 59.0 per 1,000 patient days (95% CI, 51.8-67.2) to 41.9 per 1,000 patient days (95% CI, 36.3-48.3; p < 0.001), during the intervention period. Satisfaction improved markedly from an overall hospital rating of 71.8 (95% CI, 61.1-82.6) to 93.3 (95% CI, 88.2-98.4; p < 0.001) for patients and from 84.3 (95% CI, 81.3-87.3) to 90.0 (95% CI, 88.1-91.9; p < 0.001) for care partners. No change in care plan concordance or resource utilization.

Conclusions: Implementation of a structured team communication and patient engagement program in the ICU was associated with a reduction in adverse events and improved patient and care partner satisfaction.

Full reference: Dykes, P. et al. (2017) Prospective Evaluation of a Multifaceted Intervention to Improve Outcomes in Intensive Care: The Promoting Respect and Ongoing Safety Through Patient Engagement Communication and Technology Study. Critical Care Medicine. Published online: 3rd May 2017

Why UK hospital staff find it difficult to make improvements based on patient feedback

Patients are increasingly being asked for feedback about their healthcare experiences. However, healthcare staff often find it difficult to act on this feedback in order to make improvements to services | Social Science and Medicine

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This paper draws upon notions of legitimacy and readiness to develop a conceptual framework (Patient Feedback Response Framework – PFRF) which outlines why staff may find it problematic to respond to patient feedback.

A large qualitative study was conducted with 17 ward based teams between 2013 and 2014, across three hospital Trusts in the North of England. This was a process evaluation of a wider study where ward staff were encouraged to make action plans based on patient feedback.

Through the development of the PFRF, we found that making changes based on patient feedback is a complex multi-tiered process and not something that ward staff can simply ‘do’.

  • First, staff must exhibit normative legitimacy – the belief that listening to patients is a worthwhile exercise.
  • Second, structural legitimacy has to be in place – ward teams need adequate autonomy, ownership and resource to enact change. Some ward teams are able to make improvements within their immediate control and environment.
  • Third, for those staff who require interdepartmental co-operation or high level assistance to achieve change, organisational readiness must exist at the level of the hospital otherwise improvement will rarely be enacted.

Case studies drawn from our empirical data demonstrate the above. It is only when appropriate levels of individual and organisational capacity to change exist, that patient feedback is likely to be acted upon to improve services.

Full reference: Sheard, L. et al. (2017) The Patient Feedback Response Framework – understanding why UK hospital staff find it difficult to make improvements based on patient feedback: A qualitative study. Social Science & Medicine. 178. pp. 19-27.

 

Clinical audit in commissioning

The Health care Quality Improvement Partnership has published Using Clinical audit in commissioning healthcare services.

This guide outlines how clinical audits can be used by commissioners to assure both quality and drive continuous improvement in patient care. It examines the strengths and limitations of clinical audit outputs for monitoring and assurance as well as considering how clinical audit can drive quality improvement as demonstrated through case studies and practical guidance.