Dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities

Dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities | The Royal College of Nursing  

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Image source: http://www.rcn.org.uk

This guidance aims to improve dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities.  It is designed particularly to support the nursing workforce but other health care and social care staff may find this useful.

The guidance concludes with information relating to the particular health needs that people with learning disabilities may have, and provides ideas on working in collaboration with other service providers.

Full guidance available here

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The effect of good people management

This report illustrates the effect of good people management with an analysis of the NHS | What Works Centre for Wellbeing

This report found Trusts that made the most extensive use of good people management practices were over three times more likely to have the lowest levels of staff sickness absence and at least four times more likely to have the most satisfied patients.

They were also more than twice as likely to have staff with the highest levels of job satisfaction compared to NHS Trusts that made least use of these practices, and over three times more likely to have staff with the highest levels of engagement.

Full report: Good work, wellbeing and changes in performance outcomes: Illustrating the effects of good people management practices with an analysis of the National Health Service.

Innovation in housing, care and support

This briefing contains four case studies on innovative support and care services delivered through collaborations between housing and healthcare providers. 

With homelessness on the rise at an estimated cost to the public sector of £1 billion per year, as well pressures on mental health services, there is an emerging consensus that collaborations between organisations to provide care and support in residential settings have the potential to improve patient outcomes while also relieving pressures on public finances.

Full NHS Confederation briefing: Innovation in housing, care and support

New approach to NHS clinical assessment could save thousands of lives

NHS England is asking every hospital trust to adopt the Royal College of Physicians’ new clinical assessment system, The National Early Warning
Score (NEWS) 

The National Early Warning Score (NEWS) has been produced by the Royal College of Physicians and is backed by the Royal College for Emergency Medicine, NHS Improvement, the Association of Ambulance Chairs and Sir Bruce Keogh, National Medical Director for NHS England.

The system was developed by the Royal College of Physicians with the aim of creating a standardised approach to clinical assessment across the country.

It is estimated that the NEWS is now being used in over 70% of trusts but NHS England is setting the goal of having the system in place across every acute and ambulance setting by 2019.

Having the NEWS adopted as the standard system will mean NHS staff who move between trusts are using a consistent set of measures for diagnosing patients.

Full story at NHS England