NHS launches drive to improve ‘e-nursing’

NHS Digital has launched e-nursing week in support of the campaign to re-educate the NHS workforce for a digital future. | Story via OnMedica

technology-785742_1920

NHS Digital estimates that in many settings nurses provide 80% of patient care and they are often the clinicians leading the way in utilising new technology, and creating innovative ways of improving care using new digital tools.

The Royal College of Nursing says that the effective use of information and digital technologies is a key enabler in delivering better health and social care, now and in the future and its current campaign, “Every nurse an e-nurse” seeks to ensure nurses across the NHS have the tools, skills and resources they need to make the best use of technology and act as effective e-nurses.

Full story at NHS Digital

Related Chief Nursing Officer blog: Setting an example as technology leaders

 

Advertisements

NHS launches drive to improve ‘e-nursing’

NHS Digital has launched its first ever e-nursing week in support of the campaign to re-educate the NHS workforce for a digital future | OnMedica

It has also endorsed the Royal College of Nursing’s (RCN) campaign “Every nurse an e-nurse”, and has pledged to play a supporting role in realising its ambition.

NHS Digital, is the national provider of information, data and IT systems for commissioners, analysts and clinicians in health and social care. It estimates that in many settings nurses provide 80% of patient care and they are often the clinicians leading the way in utilising new technology, and creating innovative ways of improving care using new digital tools.

The RCN says that the effective use of information and digital technologies is a key enabler in delivering better health and social care, now and in the future.

Read the full overview here

An Innovative Approach to Managing Behavioral and Psychological Dementia

The older adult population in long-term care is experiencing significant growth, which includes an increased number of minority admissions. An estimated 48% of long-term care patients are admitted with a diagnosis of dementia | The Journal for Nurse Practitioners

Highlights: 

  • Nurse practitioners are in a key position to provide culturally appropriate care in older adults with BPSD
  • Personalized music is an evidence-based, patient centered intervention to reduce BPSD
  • Regulatory agencies are closely monitoring the management of BPSD in long-term care facilities.
  • Personalized music can be an interdisciplinary approach in the management of BPSD

Patient-centered, culturally appropriate care is critical in the management of dementia and treatment of associated behavior and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). The use of personalized music playlists has shown promise in the interdisciplinary treatment of BPSD. Regulatory agencies are closely monitoring the management of BPSD. Accurate diagnosis and treatment of BPSD is an increasingly important skill for the provider.

Full reference: Long, E.M. (2017) An Innovative Approach to Managing Behavioral and Psychological Dementia. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners. Vol. 13 (Issue 7) pp. 475-481

Implementing EBP: in-hospital family-witnessed cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Sak-Dankosky, N. Nursing in Critical Care. Published online: 9 April 2017

Background: In-hospital, family-witnessed cardiopulmonary resuscitation of adults has been found to help patients’ family members deal with the short- and long-term emotional consequences of resuscitation. Because of its benefits, many national and international nursing and medical organizations officially recommend this practice. Research, however, shows that family-witnessed resuscitation is not widely implemented in clinical practice, and health care professionals generally do not favour this recommendation.

Conclusion: Despite existing evidence revealing the positive influence of family-witnessed resuscitation on patients, relatives and cardiopulmonary resuscitation process, Finnish and Polish health care providers cited a number of personal and organizational barriers against this practice. The results of this study begin to examine reasons why family-witnessed resuscitation has not been widely implemented in practice. In order to successfully apply current evidence-based resuscitation guidelines, provider concerns need to be addressed through educational and organizational changes.

Read the full abstract here

Diaries for critical care patients

Teece, A. BMJ Evidence-Based Nursing blog. Published online: 8 January 2017

notebook-1803664_960_720.jpg

Critical care nurses have a duty to provide rehabilitative care (NICE, 2009). So how can nurses make a positive impact on their patients’ psychological recovery? Patient diaries are increasing in popularity in the UK after originating in Scandinavia. The subject of a recent Cochrane review (Ullman et al., 2015), the evidence base for diaries and guidance for those completing them remains scanty. However, the premise is simple and low cost. Nurses complete entries throughout the patient’s critical care admission, describing events and the environment in layman’s terms. The diary is given to the patient after discharge, often at a follow-up clinic where further support can be accessed. The aim is, simply, to fill in memory gaps and encourage discussion.

Read the full blog post here

A Nursing Intervention for Improving Patient Safety in Critical Care

Pfrimmer, D.M. et al. (2017) Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing36(1) pp. 45–52

11556-2Background: Nursing surveillance has been identified as a key intervention in early recognition and prevention of errors/adverse events. Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC) defines surveillance as “the purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision making.” Because nurses are the main staffing constant in the critical care environment, the importance of surveillance as an intervention is fundamental.

Discussion: Surveillance was expressed through nurses’ gathering cues, reflecting on past knowledge, asking questions, verifying, and pulling it all together to find meaning. During handoff, surveillance involved collaborative cognitive work to find meaning in cues.

Read the full abstract here

Understanding quality in district nursing services

Understanding quality in district nursing services. Learning from patients, carers and staff. | Kings Fund

District nursing services play an important role in helping people to maintain their independence by supporting them to manage long-term conditions and treating acute illnesses – and demand for such services is increasing. These services will be key to the success of policies that aim to provide more care closer to home.

This report from The Kings Fund  investigates what ‘good’ district nursing care looks like from the perspective of people receiving this care, unpaid carers and district nursing staff and puts forward a framework for understanding the components involved. It also looks at the growing demand–capacity gap in district nursing and the worrying impact that this is having on services, the workforce and the quality and safety of patient care. The report makes recommendations to policy-makers, regulators, commissioners and provider organisations as to how to start to address these pressures.