A journey to improved staff engagement – in our shoes

NHS Employers, August 2017

Imperial-college

Source: NHS Employers

 

This case study looks at how Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust has significantly improved their staff engagement levels using new and innovative methods. Through engaging with staff to understand more about how they are feeling at work, engagement levels have improved from the 2015 score of 3.71 to 3.8 in 2016, which was the largest year-on-year increase of all acute trusts in London.

 

 

Improving new starter turnover: case study

NHS Employers

East-Kent-Starter-Turnover

Source: NHS Employers

This case study outlines how East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust worked to improve experiences of staff in their first year of employment at the trust. The trust improved the overall on-boarding experience including starting induction before day one in the role and introducing an online portal for new starters, along with the benefits and the challenges of doing so. This work has resulted in an improvement in new starter turnover of nearly 20 per cent.

 

Using kaizen (continuous improvement) to improve employee well-being

Participatory intervention approaches that are embedded in existing organizational structures may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of organizational interventions, but concrete tools are lacking | Human Relations

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In the present article, we use a realist evaluation approach to explore the role of kaizen, a lean tool for participatory continuous improvement, in improving employee well-being in two cluster-randomized, controlled participatory intervention studies. Case 1 is from the Danish Postal Service, where kaizen boards were used to implement action plans. The results of multi-group structural equation modeling showed that kaizen served as a mechanism that increased the level of awareness of and capacity to manage psychosocial issues, which, in turn, predicted increased job satisfaction and mental health. Case 2 is from a regional hospital in Sweden that integrated occupational health processes with a pre-existing kaizen system. Multi-group structural equation modeling revealed that, in the intervention group, kaizen work predicted better integration of organizational and employee objectives after 12 months, which, in turn, predicted increased job satisfaction and decreased discomfort at 24 months. The findings suggest that participatory and structured problem-solving approaches that are familiar and visual to employees can facilitate organizational interventions.

Full reference: von Thiele Schwarz, U. et al. (2017) Using kaizen to improve employee well-being: Results from two organizational intervention studies. Human Relations. Vol. 70 (no.08)

Workplace Mindfulness Program for Public Sector Employees

Mindfulness training appears to reduce stress and distress, but little is known about whether its appropriateness as a workplace stress management intervention for a large and distributed public sector workforce.

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This study evaluated a pilot 5-week Mindfulness at Work Program (MaWP) for acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy in relation to stress and related mental health and productivity problems for public sector employees.

The intervention thus appears to have potential merit as a workplace intervention for public sector employees across a range of outcomes. Obtaining informant observations was feasible and while qualitative analyses indicated positive changes that supported self-reported outcomes, quantitative analyses returned ambiguous results. A seven-item scale adapted from a popular self-report mindfulness scale for use by informants showed promise, but further work is needed to establish validity, reliability, and scalability of this method of assessing observable changes following mindfulness training.

Full reference: Bartlett, L. et al. (2017) Acceptability, Feasibility, and Efficacy of a Workplace Mindfulness Program for Public Sector Employees: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial with Informant Reports. Mindfulness. 8(639)

Leeds Teaching Hospitals reducing agency spend case study

This case study shares the experience of Leeds Teaching Hospital NHS Trust on how they reduced levels of medical agency spending | NHS Employers

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The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust has reduced its medical agency spend by introducing a central deployment service and making effective use of e-rostering to deliver a consistent and professional approach to the deployment of junior doctors.

This case study details the work the trust has carried out, from the medical workforce team working with medical managers, consultants and junior doctors to standardisation of processes. Read up on the steps they took towards improvement and the successes that have been achieved.

Download the full case study here

Reward In The NHS: Good Practice And Innovation Taking Place Across The NHS

In this report, we share the key areas being taken forward and look at how organisations are changing their approach to reward | NHS Employers

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Image source: NHS Employers

This report captures the themes, good practice, and innovation that have emerged from NHS Employers’ Total Reward Engagement Network over the last year. It focuses on key elements of reward and how organisations are changing their approach to reward.

Read the full report here