Reducing agency spend through a collaborative mobile app

NHS Employers, October 2017

This case study describes how Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust has maximised the take up of bank shifts through development of a mobile app allowing clinicians to self-select shifts.

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The future of the mental health workforce

 The future of the mental health workforce | Centre for Mental Health

This report is based on insights from service users, carers and professionals and outlines a list of recommendations for a sustainable mental health workforce.

It emphasises the importance of prevention, including the role of GPs in supporting people before they reach crisis point. It describes commissioning of mental health services as in “crisis” with a “shrinking workforce, growing expectations and exhausting demands” putting pressure on staff across the country.

The report makes 22 recommendations for policy, practice, education and training, highlighting 4 key calls to action:

  1. For mental health careers to be promoted in schools and colleges: to build on growing awareness and understanding about mental health to encourage young people to aspire to work in the sector when they’re considering their career choices
  2. For all mental health service providers to support the mental health and wellbeing of their staff: to become ‘compassionate organisations’ that care for the people who work in them
  3. For mental health workers to get training in the skills they will need in the future, including in coproduction, community engagement and psychological interventions
  4. For people to be able to build their careers more flexibly, working in a range of different settings and sectors, and taking on new roles as they get older

Download the full report: The future of the mental health workforce

Getting into shape: Delivering a workforce for integrated care

This paper focuses on the structural barriers to delivering integrated care. It studies issues such as the medical labour market, devolved workforce planning and pay, and professional boundaries | Reform

reform

Image source: Reform

The Government is rightly committed to a radical reshaping of NHS delivery, based on a shift to new care models and treatment in the community. Its management of the NHS workforce, however, has not delivered with nearly three times more doctors, and four times more nurses in the acute sector than in the community. Since 2009, the number of consultants has risen by nearly a third, whilst the number of GPs has fallen.
Freedom of Information requests made for this report found that, across 61 acute trusts, only 6 per cent of consultants work in the community for at least one session per week.

As the Government and the NHS leadership have repeatedly said, the priority for the NHS is to increase its speed of innovation. To do this, the NHS is rightly seeking to devolve decision-making and to deregulate. For the workforce, however, policy remains highly centralised and tightly regulated. This paper shows how to bring the same reform ideas to the workforce as the NHS is applying to other areas.

The State of Child Health: Community paediatric workforce

New report, published the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) and the British Association for Community Child Health (BACCH), highlights an alarming 25% shortfall in the number of community paediatricians.

The report raises concerns over the system failing to cope with growing demand and the unprecedented pressures faced by specialist community children’s doctors, who have a wide remit from child protection to managing children with disabilities and diagnosing those with conditions such as autism and ADHD.

The report makes a number of recommendations to turn the situation around. This includes an increase of 25% in the number of community paediatricians, equivalent to 320 more doctors, to meet recommended levels and reduce waiting times. It also provides extensive guidance and clear specifications for commissioners, clinicians and health care organisations, all with the aim of providing a high quality of care.

Download the State of Child Health: Community paediatric workforce

Read more about the RCPCH State of Child Health series

Transformational change

Leading Large Scale Change: A practical guide | NHS England Sustainable Improvement Team | NHS England Horizons Team

This guide from NHS England has been produced to help all those involved in seeking to achieve transformational change in complex health and care environments. This is a fully revised update of the original 2011 publication, responding to current health and care policy and practice, and introducing new concepts, tools and techniques to help deliver successful large scale change. It is relevant to all those involved in transformational change programmes such as Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs) and the development of new care models, and has relevance across public services.

The publication includes:

  • Updates on the leading transformational change models
  • The latest thinking from national and global improvement
    experts and change leaders
  • New tools, techniques and tips to help effectively progress
    large scale change programmes
  • Case studies and learning that will help leaders and
    change agents in health and care and across public
    services
  • Signposting to a host of new online resources including
    videos, presentations and digital media links.

Full document: Leading Large Scale Change: A guide to leading large scale change through complex health and social care environments

 

Improving work health for a healthy economy

New initiative launched to support small businesses in improving work health

Illness among working age people costs the UK economy £100 billion a year. About 330,000 every year become unemployed because of health-related issues.

However, workplace health and wellbeing programmes such as exercise, healthy eating and stop smoking support have been shown to make a real difference. Successful programmes such as these have been found to return £2 to £10 for every £1 spent, benefiting staff wellbeing and economic productivity.

Most big employers already have some plans in place that help to improve and protect their staff’s health but many small and medium enterprises (SMEs) do not currently benefit from such programmes.

PHE and Healthy Working Futures, a workplace health provider, has set out advice for SMEs, which account for 60% of private sector employment.

PHE has also created a series of guidance for employers on important issues, such as musculoskeletal (MSK) and mental health, impacting on employees with Business in the Community. Further advice is being developed covering issues including:

  • physical activity
  • diet and weight
  • drugs
  • alcohol
  • tobacco

Full press release at Public Health England