Digital literacy important for delivering better & safer care

Our TEL Programme is excited to be working in partnership with the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) on some of our digital literacy work | HEE

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Image source: HEE

The RCN has endorsed our work to date and are working with us on promoting the widest use across the health and care landscape of our definition of digital literacy and the digital capabilities that sit within that definition. Our latest document‘Improving digital literacy’, published today, explains what digital literacy is and why it is important.

Ian Cumming, our Chief Executive, and Janet Davies, RCN’s Chief Executive and General Secretary, have written the foreword for the joint document which outlines:

  • Why digital capabilities are so important in the provision of the best care
  • Why the right digital knowledge, skills, behaviours and attitudes are important and relevant to each and all of us working in health and care
  • What those digital capabilities are
  • Work undertaken to date on the digital literacy programme of work.

The document also highlights the RCN’s focus on developing digital capabilities in the nursing and midwifery workforce and why this will bring tangible benefits to citizens and patients.

Promoting Evidence-Based Practice at a Primary Stroke Center

Promoting a culture of evidence-based practice within a health care facility is a priority for health care leaders and nursing professionals; however, tangible methods to promote translation of evidence to bedside practice are lacking | Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing

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Objectives: The purpose of this quality improvement project was to design and implement a nursing education intervention demonstrating to the bedside nurse how current evidence-based guidelines are used when creating standardized stroke order sets at a primary stroke center, thereby increasing confidence in the use of standardized order sets at the point of care and supporting evidence-based culture within the health care facility.

Discussion: This nurse education strategy increased RNs’ confidence in ability to explain the path from evidence to bedside nursing care by demonstrating how evidence-based clinical practice guidelines provide current evidence used to create standardized order sets. Although further evaluation of the intervention’s effectiveness is needed, this educational intervention has the potential for generalization to different types of standardized order sets to increase nurse confidence in utilization of evidence-based practice.

Full reference: Case, C.A. (2017) Promoting Evidence-Based Practice at a Primary Stroke Center: A Nurse Education Strategy. Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing. 36(4) pp. 244–252

Knowledge transfer partnership programme announced

Knowledge Transfer Partnership announced at CSO Conference ‘Bringing Science and Innovation to the Heart of the NHS’

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NHS England is set to launch its first Knowledge Transfer Partnership Programme, a 12 month development programme, aimed at clinical leaders in healthcare science.  Successful applicants who secure a place will work with other leading healthcare scientists and build long-term collaborations across clinical, research and industry sectors, whilst identifying new approaches to measuring improved outcomes, ultimately for NHS patients.

Medical school tripled GP trainee output after raising exposure to general practice

The University of Cambridge medical school more than tripled its output of GP trainees in 2016 after implementing measures to give students and F2 doctors greater exposure to general practice | GP Online

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Giving medical students and junior doctors more exposure to general practice placements could give a real boost to interest in GP careers, the outcome suggests.

For F2 leavers in 2016, almost a quarter (22%) of those who graduated from the University of Cambridge and went directly into further training opted to begin GP training, according to official data.

Just one year before, in 2015, the university had the lowest proportion of F2s entering GP training in the England, at just 7%.

Read the full news article here

Education and training for sepsis

Health Education England has published Getting it right: the current state of sepsis education and training for healthcare staff across England.

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Image source: http://www.hee.nhs.uk

The purpose of this report is to provide a broad understanding of the current provision of sepsis education and training for healthcare staff across England. The report includes examples of good and innovative practice in sepsis training and highlights high quality educational resources which could be promoted nationally for use in sepsis training.

Social media as a tool for antimicrobial stewardship

Pisano, J. et al (2016) American Journal of Infection Control44(11) pp. 1231–1236

Highlights

  • Medical trainees can be engaged through the use of social media.
  • Social media can be used to increase awareness and use of educational tools.
  • Clinical pathway use increased through increased awareness and periodic reminders.
  • Antibiotic knowledge increased as a result of following our program on social media.

Abstract

mobile-phone-1704781_960_720Background: To increase the reach of our antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP), social media platforms, Facebook and Twitter, were used to increase internal medicine residents’ (IMRs’) antibiotic (Abx) knowledge and awareness of ASP resources.

Methods: Fifty-five of 110 (50%) IMRs consented to participate; 39 (71%) completed both pre- and postintervention surveys and followed our ASP on social media. Along with 20 basic Abx and infectious diseases (IDs) questions, this survey assessed IMR awareness of ASP initiatives, social media usage, and attitudes and beliefs surrounding Abx resistance. Over 6 months, IMRs received posts and Tweets of basic Abx/IDs trivia while promoting use of educational tools and clinical pathways on our ASP Web site. To compare pre- and postsurvey responses, McNemar test or Stuart-Maxwell test was used for categorical variables, and paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for continuous variables, as appropriate.

Results: Of the IMRs, 98% and 58% use Facebook and Twitter, respectively. To compare pre- and postintervention, median scores for Abx knowledge increased from 12 (interquartile range, 8-13) to 13 (interquartile range, 11-15; P = .048); IMRs knowing how to access the ASP Web site increased from 70% to 94%. More IMRs indicated that they used the clinical pathways “sometimes, frequently, or always” after the intervention (33% vs 61%, P = .004).

Conclusions: Social media is a valuable tool to reinforce ASP initiatives while encouraging the use of ASP resources to promote antimicrobial mindfulness.

Read the abstract here

Using educational video to enhance protocol adherence for medical procedures†

andler, L. et al. British Journal of  Anaesthesia. 2016. 116 (5): pp.662-669.

Background: Better education of clinicians is expected to enhance patient safety. An important component of education is adherence to standard protocols, which are mainly available in written form. Believing in the potential power of videos, we hypothesized that the introduction of an educational video, based on an institutional standard protocol, would foster adherence to the protocol.

Methods: We conducted a prospective intervention study of 425 anaesthesia procedures and teams (202 pre-video and 223 post-video) involving 1091 team members (516 pre-video and 575 post-video) in seven individual operating areas (with a total of 30 operating rooms) in a university hospital. Failure of adherence to safety-critical tasks during rapid sequence anaesthesia inductions was assessed during systematic on-site observations pre- and post-introduction of an educational video demonstrating evidence-based and best practice guidelines.

Results: The odds for failure of adherence to safety-critical tasks between the pre- and post-intervention period were reduced, odds ratio 0.34 (95% confidence interval 0.27–0.42, P<0.001). The risk for failure of adherence was reduced significantly for eight of the 14 safety-critical tasks (allP<0.001).

Conclusions: This study provides empirical evidence for the effectiveness of an educational video to enhance adherence to a standard protocol during complex medical procedures. The introduction of a video can reduce failure of adherence to safety-critical tasks and contribute to patient safety. We recommend the introduction of videos to improve protocol adherence.

Read the abstract here