Child protection information to be shared with school nurses and health visitors

A tool that provides data on protected vulnerable children for the NHS and local authorities is being broadened to include school nurses and health visitors | NHS Digital

The move forms part of NHS Digital’s response to the coronavirus pandemic and is intended to strengthen protection for children at risk of abuse at a time when the risk for many is heightened.

Child Protection Information Sharing (CP-IS) is a system that alerts NHS staff when children who are subject to a child protection plan, or children designated as ‘looked after’, or pregnant women who have an unborn child protection plan, present at an unscheduled care setting (such as an A&E or walk in centre). It also alerts the child’s social worker when such a visit occurs, ensuring a joined up full picture.

Now the system is being urgently amended so that school nurses and health visitors will receive details of all children falling under any of those three categories in their school or area. The information will be sent to them via their clinical system from the NHS Spine.

Full detail at NHS Digital

Supporting young people through transition into adult care services (Sheffield Teaching Hospitals)

NHS England | November 2018 | Supporting young people through transition into adult care services 

Nurses at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Foundation Trust (STHFT) recognised unwarranted variation in practice within the Trust where children were being transitioned between services, recognising gaps within coordination, information available to children and families and in some clinical specialist service areas, leading to delays in care.

 

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This led to the creation of a new role: the Children and Young People Lead Nurse  to  transition between children’s and adult services, offering support to all clinical specialist areas within the hospital. The Children and Young People Lead Nurse engages with families, children and young people with complex needs and provides specialist advice and support to staff to ensure prompt, safe transition into adult services. This role also aimed to support the development of pathways and standardised practice to ensure high quality care at transition was available to all complex needs children within the Trust.

The Lead Nurse developed the role by working seamlessly with the transition team at Sheffield Children’s Hospital and establishing a dedicated caseload of children and young people, to give a clear overview of the transition work being carried out by each clinical specialty. They provide education and training sessions for staff and partner agencies in understanding the needs of adolescents, as well as those with complex needs.

This yielded:

  • better outcomes
  • better experience
  • better use of resources  (Source: NHS England)

Full case study is available from NHS England’s Shared Atlas of Learning 

Child Protection Information Sharing (CP-IS) using smartcards

A new case study on NHS England’s atlas of shared learning explores how a Deputy Chief Nurse responsible for safeguarding and harm-free care at Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust (BHRUT) identified an opportunity to use new digital technology to introduce electronic Child Protection-Information Sharing (CP–IS) to the Trust. The CP-IS is now being used to help identify children with particular safeguarding needs whenever they are registered as a patient. 

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Implementation of the CP-IS has facilitated better information sharing, better outcomes for patient safety and better use of resources, as its introduction has reduced cost and time in supporting children and young people’s  administrative process (Source: NHS England).

Full details at NHS England 

Best start in life: cost-effective commissioning

A tool to help local commissioners provide cost-effective interventions for children aged up to 5 and pregnant women | Public Health England

This return on investment tool pulls together evidence on the effectiveness and associated costs for a number of interventions aimed at providing children with the best start in life.

The interactive resource allows results to be tailored to local situations based on the knowledge of the user. The tool is accompanied by a report providing further details on how the tool was constructed.

Local authorities and clinical commissioning groups can use results from the tool to protect and improve the health of their local populations when making commissioning decisions.

Participation in exercise programme improves BMI of US school children

School children in the US, (n= 707) who participated in an short-term  exercise programme experienced  improvements in  their body mass index (BMI) scores,  significantly different than the comparison group. This group also had higher odds of being in a lower BMI category at follow-up; significantly different than the comparison group.

running-2837486_1920The 12-week initiative ran for an hour three times a week.  Each session started with a warm-up, followed by a running activity, and incorporated a skills-based approach to teach a new skill each week. During the cool- down session there was discussion on nutrition for pupils.

By the end of the the programme the child participants had better body mass index scores, than the non- participants in the control group.  There was also an additional benefit for those children who participated three times a week as their focus on schoolwork improved, and those who attended two sessions a week also had notable improvements in their mood and energy levels.

The full story can be read at Science Daily 

The journal article is published online and is available here 

Full reference: Whooten, R. C. et al. |Effects of Before-School Physical Activity on Obesity Prevention and Wellness | American Journal of Preventative Medicine | 2018|  doi:  10.1016/j.amepre.2018.01.017

Transforming children and young people’s mental health

Ways for schools and colleges to support pupils’ mental health are set out in a green paper, as well as plans for new mental health support teams.

The government has published proposals to improve mental health support for children and young people in England. Over £300 million has been made available to fund them.

The government is asking people for their views on the planned measures, which are set out in a green paper. The measures include:

  • encouraging every school and college to have a ‘designated senior mental health lead’
  • setting up mental health support teams working with schools, to give children and young people earlier access to services
  • piloting a 4-week waiting time for NHS children and young people’s mental health services

Other proposals in the green paper include:

  • a new working group to look at mental health support for 16 to 25-year-olds
  • a report by the Chief Medical Officer on the impact that technology has on children and young people’s mental health, to be produced in 2018

The consultation on the green paper will run for 13 weeks until 2 March 2018.

Full document: Transforming children and young people’s mental health provision: a green paper

This short video describes the main proposals in the green paper.

The State of Child Health: Community paediatric workforce

New report, published the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) and the British Association for Community Child Health (BACCH), highlights an alarming 25% shortfall in the number of community paediatricians.

The report raises concerns over the system failing to cope with growing demand and the unprecedented pressures faced by specialist community children’s doctors, who have a wide remit from child protection to managing children with disabilities and diagnosing those with conditions such as autism and ADHD.

The report makes a number of recommendations to turn the situation around. This includes an increase of 25% in the number of community paediatricians, equivalent to 320 more doctors, to meet recommended levels and reduce waiting times. It also provides extensive guidance and clear specifications for commissioners, clinicians and health care organisations, all with the aim of providing a high quality of care.

Download the State of Child Health: Community paediatric workforce

Read more about the RCPCH State of Child Health series

Improving care and support for children and young people with mental health problems

Three Royal Colleges have jointly agreed five shared principles designed to improve care and support for children and young people with mental health problems.

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The Royal College of General Practitioners, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and The Royal College of Psychiatrists have issued a position statement saying that as well as the commissioning of specialist treatment, an effective child and young people’s (CYP) mental health system required:

  • acknowledgment that CYP mental health is everybody’s business and should be supported by a shared vision for CYP mental health across all government departments
  • a preventative, multi-agency approach to mental health across all ages, incorporating attention to education for young people and families, social determinants, and health promotion
  • a system of national and local accountability for population-level CYP mental health and well-being, delivered via integrated local area systems
  • training and education for the whole children’s workforce in their role and responsibilities for CYP mental health
  • more support, both from specialist services and other sectors, for professionals dealing with CYP who do not meet referral threshold to CAMHS.

Full document: Position statement on children and young peoples’ mental health

Tackling culture change to transform mental health services

Mandip Kaur for the King’s Fund Blog | 16th March 2017

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Traditionally, mental health services are delivered by Children and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) up until the age of 16 or 18 – or when a young person leaves school or college – at which point they’re expected to transition to adult mental health services. It’s long been recognised that this is a poor boundary for service transition, often having a further detrimental effect on mental health.

Forward Thinking Birmingham delivers mental health services for children and young people aged up to 25, combining the expertise of Birmingham Children’s Hospital, Worcester Health and Care Trust, Beacon UK, The Children’s Society and The Priory Group. The partnership’s vision is that Birmingham should be the first city where mental health problems are not a barrier to young people achieving their dreams. The transformational changes to the service were driven by the need to address disjointed and fragmented care provision, complicated service models, long waiting lists and rising demand. The service operates a ‘no wrong door’ policy and aims to provide joined-up care, focusing on individual needs, with improved access and choice for young people.

Read the full blog post here

Improving outcomes for children and families

The Local Government Association has published Improving outcomes for children and families in the early years: a key role for health visiting services

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Image source: http://www.local.gov.uk

This guide highlights the importance of health visitors and commissioners to work together to monitor and evaluate the impact of the health visiting service.

The report includes case studies demonstrating examples of innovation.